Halls of Residence Glasgow

Student halls are the most common student accommodation in universities and all the pros and cons of living in come in trumps. For the most part, it’s first year students that end up in halls.

University Of Glasgow
+44 (0) 141 330 1835
11 Eldon Street
Glasgow
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Royal Scottish Academy Of Music & Drama
+44 (0) 141 332 4101
100 Renfrew Street
Glasgow
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University Of Strathclyde
+44 (0) 141 552 4400
16 Richmond Street
Glasgow
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University Of Strathclyde
+44 (0) 141 552 4400
40-50 George Street
Glasgow
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Paisley University
+44 (0) 141 848 3000
High Street
Paisley
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Glasgow School Of Art
+44 (0) 141 353 4500
167 Renfrew Street
Glasgow
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Stow College
+44 (0) 141 332 1786
Shamrock Street
Glasgow
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University of Strathclyde
+44 (0) 141 552 4400
George Street
Glasgow
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Caledonian University Union
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70 Cowcaddens Road
Glasgow
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Kelvinside Academy CCF
0141 357 4708
2 Mirrlees Drive
Glasgow
 
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Halls of Residence

A hall of residence is a block of student rooms. Some house as few as 20 or 30 students, but more usually it’s several hundred.

Student halls are the most common student accommodation in universities and all the pros and cons of living in come in trumps. For the most part, it’s first year students that end up in halls.

The classic example is a series of 8’ by 10’ boxes arranged along corridors with shared bathrooms and kitchenettes. In each room, there’s a contraceptive bed (so-called because it’s so narrow), a desk, a wardrobe, a sink, a desk-lamp, a bookshelf, an insufficient number of power points, a chair that doesn’t fit between the bed and the desk, magnolia paint and orange or purple or orange-and-purple curtains.

It’s bloody student heaven, that is.

Actually, that’s a really basic room in a hall of residence. These days most of them are quite a few notches better. A bit larger, better décor, a few more props, a socket for internet access, en suite shower room, bay window, satellite telly socket and so on. Meanwhile, elsewhere in the hall, there’s a bar, TV room, snooker room, squash courts, bike shed, storage rooms, tuck shop, launderette, cafeteria and fully equipped kitchens for every half-dozen rooms.

Now we’ve gone too far the other way, but in fact everything mentioned above is available at some universities in some halls — but not necessary all at the same time and definitely not at all halls.

Most universities have both newer halls (quite high spec, so they can cash in on the conference trade) and some that are a bit more run down. It’s always a good idea to find out which are the best halls and put in a request to stay there.

Generally, if you want more, you pay more, but you don’t always have the choice. (Also, be a little wary of halls that are too plush. You probably have the conference problem every vacation and won’t be allowed to breathe without being told not to damage the paintwork.)

Sometimes food is laid on if you’re in halls. Sometimes you’re expected to cook it yourself. For more info on catered accommodation, click here...

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