University Residence Homes Winchester

’Living in’ means living in housing owned or at least run by the university. As a wild and inaccurate generalisation, most traditional first years want to live in because it makes life so much simpler to start with. By the second year, they’re happy to move out.

Thorncliffe School & Specialist Sports College
01229 894605
Thorncliffe Road
Barrow in Furness
 
Hampstead Fine Arts College
020 7586 0312
24 Lambolle Place
London
Setting
Camden
Religion
Not Applicable

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The City of Leicester College
0116 241 3984
Downing Drive
Leicester
Setting
Leicester City
Religion
Non-denominational

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Guildford College of Further and Higher Education Merrist Wood Campus
01483 884 000
Merrist Wood
Guildford
Setting
Surrey
Religion
Non-denominational

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Davies Laing and Dick College
020 7935 8411
100 Marylebone Lane
London
Setting
Westminster
Religion
Non-denominational

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Highlands College of Further Education
01534 608 608
St Saviour
Setting
Jersey
Religion
Unknown

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Bromley College of Further and Higher Education
020 8295 7000
Rookery Lane
Bromley
Setting
Bromley
Religion
Non-denominational

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St Martins College
01228 616222
Fusehill Street
Carlisle
 
City of Westminster College
020 7723 8826
Paddington Basin Campus
London
Setting
Westminster
Religion
Non-denominational

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Salford City College
0161 736 5074
Dronfield Road
Salford
Setting
Salford
Religion
Non-denominational

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Living In

’Living in’ means living in housing owned or at least run by the university. As a wild and inaccurate generalisation, most traditional first years want to live in because it makes life so much simpler to start with. By the second year, they’re happy to move out.

When it comes to the final year, they often wouldn’t mind coming back so that the university facilities are close by as they approach their final exams.

However, the choice is rarely entirely theirs.

While some universities like Exeter, Essex, Surrey, Stirling, and a few others, can house all their first years and most (if not all) of the finalists too, others (such as Bournemouth, Bristol West of England, Central Lancashire, Glamorgan, Glasgow Caledonian, London Metropolitan and plenty more besides) can’t even give a guarantee to every first year student who wants to live in. Depending on the availability of housing locally, that can be a real downer.

Generally, the pros of living in are reckoned to be as follows:
  • It works out cheaperusually — not just because rents tend to be lower than if you rent privately, but also because, apart from the phone, all the bills are included (which also means you’re less likely to have your heating cut off because you forgot to pay the gas bill). But, mostly, it’s cheaper because you only get charged for term-time (or lower rents during vacations anyway).
  • It’s more sociable, because you’re usually in housing shared with loads of other students.
  • It’s closer. If you’re in halls on campus, you may be able to roll out bed at 10.55am and still make it on time for an eleven o’clock lecture. This definitely isn’t always the case. Some universities’ accommodation is miles from anywhere useful to anyone. (London University has halls in Rotherhithe, for example. Okay, it’s more central than some students can find otherwise, but it’s not near any teaching or other facilities.)
  • It’s more convenient, because most basic facilities are laid on for you — such as kitchens and/or a cafeteria, launderettes, common rooms and furniture in your room. There’s also usually someone to empty the bins and clean the hallways (occasionally even your room).
  • It’s more reliable. In theory at least, if anything goes wrong, you don’t have to wait six months for your Rachmanite landlord to send round a bloke with a trouser cleavage who only ends up making it worse.
  • It’s safer. It’s not just the safety in numbers thing, but the university can generally afford precautions like entry-phones and CCTV.
The cons:
  • It’s noisier. By the time you’re knuckling down to your finals, you may not appreciate 14 verses of ‘Lily the Pink’ from your neighbours at three in the morning. During freshers’ week, on the other hand, it’s cool.
  • Rules. Some universities outl...

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